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GroFin Ghana honored at 14th Ghana-Africa Business Awards

GroFin won its second Gold Award in the Financial Services (SME Development) category Ghana-Africa Business Awards. GroFin has been operating in Ghana since 2010 and previously received the same award in 2015.

GroFin received both awards in recognition of its outstanding contribution to the development of Ghana, within the context of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD). GroFin has invested over $30 million (USD) in 66 small and medium-sized businesses in the country. This investment allowed these businesses to sustain 3,224 jobs and to create 411 new direct jobs.  The Ghana-Africa Business Awards, now in their 14th year, are organised under the auspices of the Ghanaian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration.

Samuel Sedegah, Investment Executive at GroFin Ghana, says the company is honored by this acknowledgment of its efforts to develop small and medium-sized businesses in the country.

“SMEs are a key driver of job creation and economic growth in developing economies, and already contribute over 70% of Ghana’s GDP. However, the potential of many of these businesses remains constrained by a lack of access to finance.”

Indeed, according to the latest World Bank Enterprise Survey, 49% of Ghanaian firms cite access to finance as their greatest obstacle. Sedegah explains that GroFin not only provides entrepreneurs with appropriate financing, but also with continuous business support to grow, and ensure their success.

“SMEs are prone to very high failure rates. GroFin helps entrepreneurs to overcome this by offering a combination of finance and expert advice and business support that improves their ability to manage the complexity of a growing business.”

GroFin’s 2015 Ghana-Africa Business Awards was also in the GOLD category, after the organizer’s held consultations with the Ghana Export Promotion Center, Ghana Investment Promotion Center, Ghana Free Zones Board and Ghana Tourism Authority.

About GroFin

GroFin is a pioneering private development financial institution specialising in financing and supporting small and growing businesses (SGBs) across Africa and the Middle East. We combine medium term loan capital and specialised business support to grow SGBs in emerging markets. By successfully combining medium term loans and specialised business support delivered through our local offices, we have invested in over 700 SMEs and sustained over 88,150 jobs across a wide spectrum of business activities within the 15 countries in Africa and Middle East that we operate in. GroFin has its headquarters located in Mauritius.

Media enquiries: Samuel Sedegah, samuels@grofin.com

GroFin honoured in Global SME Finance Awards

GroFin’s innovative SME development model of combining access to finance, business support and market-linkages has received further recognition through an Honourable Mention at this year’s Global SME Finance Awards.

The GroFin Small and Growing Businesses Fund (“SGB Fund”) recently received this accolade in the “Product Innovation of the Year” category. The Global SME Finance Awards recognize outstanding achievements of financial institutions and fintech companies, in delivering exceptional products and services to their SME clients and are endorsed by the Global Partnership for Financial Inclusion (GPFI).

GroFin receives Honorable Mention at Global SME Finance Awards 2018

Guido Boysen, CEO, says GroFin is honoured by this recognition which affirms the merit of its approach to developing small and medium-sized businesses.

“GroFin has demonstrated how the typically very high fail rate among SMEs can be mitigated and through a model that is scalable. This means that GroFin’s approach can be replicated to make an even greater contribution to the development of emerging economies.”

Finance provided through the SGB Fund, coupled with business support interventions, have ensured that the SGB Fund has a viability rate of 86%, compared to a failure rate of 70- 90% for SMEs in emerging economies.

Guido Boysen says the SGB Fund is also regarded as innovative in its design to not only achieve socio-economic impact objectives, but also to generate sustainable returns for its investors.

“The ability to generate financial returns attracts investors and greatly strengthens the sustainability of the fund. This is crucial to any developmental project or fund which hopes to make a lasting impact.”

Earlier this year GroFin won the ICAEW and A4S Finance for the Future Awards, in the Building Sustainable Financial Products category, as well as the 2018 Islamic Economy Award in the ‘SME Development’ category.

About GroFin

GroFin is a pioneering private development financial institution specialising in financing and supporting small and growing businesses (SGBs) across Africa and the Middle East. We combine medium term loan capital and specialised business support to grow SGBs in emerging markets. By successfully combining medium term loans and specialised business support delivered through our local offices, we have invested in over 700 SMEs and sustained over 88,150 jobs across a wide spectrum of business activities within the 15 countries in Africa and Middle East that we operate in. GroFin has its headquarters located in Mauritius.

About the GroFin Small and Growing Businesses Fund (“SGB Fund”)

Established in 2014 and based on GroFin’s then decade-long experience in supporting entrepreneurs across emerging economies in Africa, the GroFin Small and Growing Businesses Fund (“SGB Fund”) focuses on SGBs that are typically neglected by traditional financiers and even conventional SME funds – the SME “missing middle” segment.

The Fund’s unique model integrates access to finance, business development skills and market linkages to ensure job creation at scale and facilitates the provision of vital services to low income households. It focuses on high impact sectors including education, healthcare, agribusiness, manufacturing and key services and further envelop women and youth as beneficiaries of its model.

Millennial movement: Why the young are impact investment’s big hope

Even as ‘The Economist’ noted in an authoritative piece at the start of 2017 that impact investing has come of age, moving into 2018 it looks like the rise of impact investing is indeed an age-related phenomenon. Powering the growth of impact investing are the millennial youth, the freshly minted generation of the 1980s and 1990s, who are looking set to bring impact investments from the realm of ‘good-to-have’ to ‘must-have’.

Even as ‘The Economist’ noted in an authoritative piece at the start of 2017 that impact investing has come of age, moving into 2018 it looks like the rise of impact investing is indeed an age-related phenomenon. Powering the growth of impact investing are the millennial youth, the freshly minted generation of the 1980s and 1990s, who are looking set to bring impact investments from the realm of ‘good-to-have’ to ‘must-have’.

Acknowledging this change that is set to sweep through the impact investment world, ‘The Economist’ noted at the close of 2017 that the young are Impact Investing’s big hope. Having grown up in a digital age, millennials are both more exposed to the world’s woes, and more likely to use electronic investment tools. It then becomes clear for all to see that a powerful force for good which uses the best of modern technology to power its growth is unstoppable indeed.

And, where else would this change commence but from the education sector – an arena that reflects societal changes even before they take root in the real world. No surprise then that this millennial magic is already visible in the field of higher education. Under pressure from their alumni, several university endowments have promised to review their investment portfolios under a ‘socially responsible’ lens. Business schools are also reporting that classes related to Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) investments are oversubscribed. With ESG being the new mantra of the impact investment world, an increase in ESG investments invariably indicates increased uptake of impact investing as a global phenomenon.

So, what is the size of this global force for good? Global consultancy firm Deloitte estimates that, by 2020, millennials may control up to US$24trn. The vast stores of wealth at their disposal, coupled with their optimistic belief that they can ‘change the world’, means that they are set to take the world of impact investment by storm.

This is backed up by a survey in America by Morgan Stanley that is found in their “Sustainable Signals” report for 2017 which examines the findings of an impact-investing-focused survey of 1,000 active investors across the age spectrum, and is a sequel to a 2015 report on the same theme.

Morgan Stanley’s survey found that millennials have underpinned the growth of the market for impact investing. From 2015 to 2017, those who said they were very interested in impact investing grew by 10 percentage points, to 38%. The report also noted that Millennials “are twice as likely as the overall pool to invest in companies or funds that target social or environmental outcomes. A whopping 75% millennials agreed that their investments could influence climate change, compared with 58% of the overall population. They are also twice as likely as investors in general to check product packaging or invest in companies that espouse social or environmental objectives. And, like children of every generation, they influence their parents – baby boomers who have large fortunes of their own.

Meanwhile, a 2016 survey by the Toniic institute, the global action community for impact investors with members in 26 countries, showed that millennials surveyed across 6 continents were indeed interested in impact investing. While some are taking a portfolio approach, others are considering how to align their careers and their philanthropic activities with their values and impact investments.

However, they also cited various challenges in the way of playing a more active role in the impact investment space. Overall, the survey concluded that millennials need more support to realise their impact objectives. While the young generation demonstrates a thoughtful, rigorous approach to impact investing, they need more access to tailored capacity building in impact investing as well as robust investment channels across asset classes. Finally, while they currently leverage their friends and investor networks to access the right causes and companies to invest in, they also want to collaborate more with their family members and advisors.

It is clear then that the millennial generation needs more information on the impact investing space as they take crucial decisions about partnering with organisations and joining forces for social change. Impact investors that possess deep insights and access into markets that are otherwise complex to understand and tough to reach, can then make it easier for the millennial generation to maximise their impact.

GroFin is one such organisation that has pioneered impact investing in emerging economies across Sub-Saharan Africa and the Middle East & North Africa (MENA). With a unique, award winning model that provides Small and Growing Businesses (SGBs) not only with access to finance but also tailored business support, GroFin manages various funds through which millennials and other investors can participate in the challenging yet rewarding impact investment space in Africa and MENA.

With a primary focus on vital needs sectors such as education, healthcare, agribusiness, manufacturing and key services such as water, waste and energy, GroFin has achieved a high impact footprint across its 15 locations of operation. To illustrate, GroFin has supported 8,750 entrepreneurs, financed 673 SMEs, helped sustain 115,580 jobs and improved the lives of 577,905 people as at 31 December 2017.

So, partner with us and become a part of this exponential movement to change the lives of entrepreneurs and communities across Africa and MENA.

What businesses can do to promote women empowerment in Africa

Eliminating gender inequality and empowering women could raise the productive potential of one billion Africans, delivering a huge boost to the continent’s development potential,” notes the African Development Bank on women empowerment.

In this context, businesses have a key role to play in advancing women’s economic empowerment in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). In addition to their human rights obligations, companies are increasingly viewing women’s economic empowerment as a core part of their mission and values. Indeed, they have a business interest in ensuring that women employees, suppliers, distributors, and customers succeed – McKinsey Global Institute estimates that if women participated in the economy as equal counterparts to men, it would add as much as US$28 trillion to the annual global GDP by 2025.

Unfortunately, women in SSA face deeply rooted obstacles to achieving their potential at work. First, women in the workforce, regardless of industry, face many common challenges such as the need for additional education and training for career progression, a lack of female role models, the absence of good childcare options and decent maternity leave, and risks to their personal safety and security. Second, for women to be economically empowered, it will take much more than a job – there is an urgent need to go beyond to invest in the resources, opportunities, protections, and skills that women need to achieve their full potential and decide what they want to do with their lives. Third, to address systemic challenges, companies will need to partner locally and globally with a wide range of organisations, including local grassroots women’s organisations, development finance institutions, local governments, public health care providers, and industry peers.

Due to the above challenges, women in SSA achieve an average of 87 percent of male human development outcomes, thus impeding economic and social development in the region. Indeed, the United Nations estimates that gender inequality costs SSA an average of US$ 95 billion a year.

These insights form part of an in-depth report released this year by the US-based non-profit organisation, Business for Social Responsibility (BSR). Titled ‘Women’s Economic Empowerment in Sub-Saharan Africa: Recommendations for Business Action’, the report outlines the role of businesses in boosting women empowerment in Africa.

BSR’s research reveals six practical areas where companies, regardless of industry, can make significant progress in advancing women’s economic empowerment in SAA. These areas include: building a gender-sensitive workplace with flexible work arrangementsto accommodate working parents, strengthen channels for women to express their concerns, and invest in quality childcare; providing leadership and advancement opportunities through fair and transparent promotion and recruitment processes, encouraging informal and formal leadership opportunities and supporting initiatives outside of the workplace such as women’s networking associations; strengthening education and training by sponsoring technical training and internships for young women, advocating for greater public investments and incentives to keep girls in school and encouraging their interest in STEM subjects; investing in policies and procedures to protect women from sexual harassment, creating secure channels to report incidents, and ensuring that such incidents are handled fairly and result in disciplinary action; providing opportunities for entrepreneurship and business linkages with transparent processes for securing business contracts, procurement policies prioritising women-owned businesses, and working more closely with local partners to ensure that women have the skills and resources to grow their businesses; and, building more inclusive communitiesby partnering with organisations that provide community services, supporting efforts to protect women’s, labour, and human rights and advocating for local governments to promote women’s economic empowerment.

Whilst much more remains to be done, the report acknowledges that the private sector already plays an important role for women in SSA by generating economic and other opportunities. Indeed, Africa, as a whole, has more women in executive committees, more women serving as CEO, and more women on company boards than the average worldwide. Despite this progress, women are still underrepresented at every level of the corporate ladder and are disproportionately affected by some of the negative impact of business.

In this context, supporting women-based businesses in SSA can go a long way towards promoting women empowerment and building inclusive communities. Women empowerment forms a core impact objective at GroFin, a development financier that focuses on small businesses across Africa and the Middle East in vital needs sectors such as education, healthcare, agribusiness, manufacturing and key services (water/energy/waste) to help entrepreneurs make a difference to their communities.

GroFin’s mission is aligned with the achievement of the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goal 5 (‘Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls’) through its emphasis on women-led businesses and female employment. In keeping with its focus on women empowerment, by close of 2016, GroFin had supported over 100 women-owned businesses and as many as 28,500 of the total jobs sustained (30%) in investee businesses were for female employees.

Women entrepreneurs such as Kenya’s Irene, whose brainchild GAEA Foods empowers farmers in the Rift Valley to supply quality potatoes to Nairobi’s competitive fast foods industry; Jordan’s Hiyam, whose school, English Talents, in turn empowers girls with the education and skills they need to succeed in a global economy; South Africa’s Rinawhose Zambesi Akademie is making a difference to more and more special needs children through the widened reach of its expanded premises; and Nigeria’s Latifat, whose Hatlab Ice Cream Delite has spawned multiple successful outlets across 3 cities and has now gone on to develop franchise management skills – GroFin’s finance and support has made a difference to women-owned businesses across Africa and the Middle East.

If you are an investor seeking to reach out to women entrepreneurs across Africa and the Middle East, we invite you to partner with us. GroFin’s proven expertise in supporting women-owned businesses, and its capacity to provide them with unprecedented access to finance, business development skills and market linkages, can help you to deepen your impact footprint.

Building an inclusive green economy in Africa, one entrepreneur at a time

To imagine a green economy alone is not enough in a world where the dominant economic model actively promotes inequalities and encourages wasteful consumption to spur unnecessary demand and production in a vicious cycle. It is the inclusive green economy that truly provides a solution to the pressing problem of environmental degradation that is affecting not only the present generation but also holding children across the globe to ransom in our hurried pursuit of quick gains.

As the United Nations notes, the inclusive green economy is a fitting alternative to the traditional economic model of capitalism which generates widespread environmental and health risks, encourages wasteful consumption and production, drives ecological and resource scarcities and results in inequality. The concept of an inclusive green economy is rooted in economic growth that goes hand in hand with sustainable development andsocial equity.

Starting this revolution in Africa then seems inevitable, as the emerging continent is writing a fresh story of growth for which an economic model that has led the developed world to the verge of ecological disaster is certainly no fitting start. As the United Nations Environment Programme highlights in its seminal work Building Inclusive Green economies in AfricaAfrica has been fortunate to realise early on that continuing with business-as-usual models of development was not a practical option in a world of increasing environmental scarcities, economic uncertainty and widespread poverty. Today, having built on a strong endowment of natural resourcesskills and cultures, Africa is well-poised to benefit from a global shift to more sustainable models of economic growth.

At GroFin, we believe that partnering with small and growing businesses to generate sustainable economic growth, jobs and social benefits, as well as protect vital natural resources, is our way of contributing towards an inclusive green economy in Africa. Ultimately, the inclusive green economy is a guaranteed pathway towards achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals for eradicating poverty while safeguarding the environment.

Founded in 2004 by a serial entrepreneur who is passionate about environmental conservation, GroFin has strong roots in championing the green economy. GroFin’s chairman and founder Jurie Willemse started a solar electricity business in 1988 when the technology was largely unknown. It is in keeping with the vision of its founding entrepreneur that GroFin prioritises energy as a sector of focus, together with allied services such as water and sanitation, all of which are the pillars of a green economy.

Indeed, GroFin’s footprint in the energy and allied sub-sectors space is a growing one and comprises of investments within the value chain related mostly to the supply of waterelectricity and waste management. GroFin has invested in 24 SMEs in this sector, representing a total investment of over USD 9.5 million and sustaining a total of 11,605 jobs across Sub-Saharan Africa and the Middle East & North Africa (MENA).

GroFin provides a unique value proposition of finance as well as value-added business support to such investee SMEs. GroFin has designated in-house key services ‘industry experts’ that work with external technical assistance partners to provide business planning, quality management systems, cash flow management and propose efficient business operation and management as well as marketing and Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) best-practice knowledge to funded SMEs in the sector.

With its dedicated focus on the energy, water and waste services sector, GroFin has provided medium term finance and business support to SMEs engaged in borehole drilling to facilitate access to potable waterproduction of purified drinking water sachetsmanufacturing and sale of renewable energy products (solar and wind), plastic recycling as also to auxiliary service providers in the utilities sector. From clients in Nigeria who provide access to clean drinking water to large segments of the population, to clients in Kenya who innovate indigenous technologies in the solar energy space, our footprint in the green economy arena covers multiple sub-sectors and geographies.

One of our clients is Botto Solar, which is a leading solar energy company in Nakuru, Kenya. Botto Solar is run by entrepreneurial couple Ephraim and Edith who have spent 20 years building the local business from a small scale solar installations to a pioneering energy savings company in Kenya.

GroFin’s investment in Botto Solar has been one of the catalysts in developing a solution to the challenges of the Dadaab refugee camp that hosts refugees from war-torn Somalia. Innovations such as a stove that runs on solar energy have helped multiple families to have access to food, which was otherwise impossible as the camp faced an increasing influx of refugees and could not cater to all of them with conventional cooking methods. Apart from finance, the business has received support to implement a new accounting system and a debt collection strategy as well as key inputs for marketing and product development.

With finance and business support from GroFin, Botto Solar is set to expand and touch many more lives. Botto Solar sustains 39 jobs and employee development is a key focus area given that many of the new hires are unskilled or semi-skilled and some are high school dropouts.

Going forward, GroFin’s objective is to further grow investments in this sector from 4% to 10-15% over the medium term, thereby facilitating access to watersanitation and energy to a wider population, especially to those in severely underserved regions in Sub-Saharan Africa and MENA. We are looking for partners in our mission to build an inclusive green economy, one entrepreneur at a time.

Ultimately, we believe at GroFin that every person deserves to have a stable job and to access basic services such as foodwaterhealthcaresanitationenergy and educationImpact investing is GroFin’s mission and our contribution to the world is to continue our focus on job creation and to accelerate our work in our priority areas of WaterEnergy and WasteAgribusinessHealthcareEducation and Manufacturing.

To imagine a green economy alone is not enough in a world where the dominant economic model actively promotes inequalities and encourages wasteful consumption to spur unnecessary demand and production in a vicious cycle. It is the inclusive green economythat truly provides a solution to the pressing problem of environmental degradation that is affecting not only the present generation but also holding children across the globe to ransom in our hurried pursuit of quick gains.

As the United Nations notes, the inclusive green economy is a fitting alternative to the traditional economic model of capitalism which generates widespread environmental and health risks, encourages wasteful consumption and production, drives ecological and resource scarcities and results in inequality. The concept of an inclusive green economy is rooted in economic growth that goes hand in hand with sustainable development andsocial equity.

Starting this revolution in Africa then seems inevitable, as the emerging continent is writing a fresh story of growth for which an economic model that has led the developed world to the verge of ecological disaster is certainly no fitting start. As the United Nations Environment Programme highlights in its seminal work Building Inclusive Green economies in AfricaAfrica has been fortunate to realise early on that continuing with business-as-usual models of development was not a practical option in a world of increasing environmental scarcities, economic uncertainty and widespread poverty. Today, having built on a strong endowment of natural resourcesskills and cultures, Africa is well-poised to benefit from a global shift to more sustainable models of economic growth.

At GroFin, we believe that partnering with small and growing businesses to generate sustainable economic growth, jobs and social benefits, as well as protect vital natural resources, is our way of contributing towards an inclusive green economy in Africa. Ultimately, the inclusive green economy is a guaranteed pathway towards achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals for eradicating poverty while safeguarding the environment.

Founded in 2004 by a serial entrepreneur who is passionate about environmental conservation, GroFin has strong roots in championing the green economy. GroFin’s chairman and founder Jurie Willemse started a solar electricity business in 1988 when the technology was largely unknown. It is in keeping with the vision of its founding entrepreneur that GroFin prioritises energy as a sector of focus, together with allied services such as water and sanitation, all of which are the pillars of a green economy.

Indeed, GroFin’s footprint in the energy and allied sub-sectors space is a growing one and comprises of investments within the value chain related mostly to the supply of waterelectricity and waste management. GroFin has invested in 24 SMEs in this sector, representing a total investment of over USD 9.5 million and sustaining a total of 11,605 jobs across Sub-Saharan Africa and the Middle East & North Africa (MENA).

GroFin provides a unique value proposition of finance as well as value-added business support to such investee SMEs. GroFin has designated in-house key services ‘industry experts’ that work with external technical assistance partners to provide business planning, quality management systems, cash flow management and propose efficient business operation and management as well as marketing and Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) best-practice knowledge to funded SMEs in the sector.

With its dedicated focus on the energy, water and waste services sector, GroFin has provided medium term finance and business support to SMEs engaged in borehole drilling to facilitate access to potable waterproduction of purified drinking water sachetsmanufacturing and sale of renewable energy products (solar and wind), plastic recycling as also to auxiliary service providers in the utilities sector. From clients in Nigeria who provide access to clean drinking water to large segments of the population, to clients in Kenya who innovate indigenous technologies in the solar energy space, our footprint in the green economy arena covers multiple sub-sectors and geographies.

One of our clients is Botto Solar, which is a leading solar energy company in Nakuru, Kenya. Botto Solar is run by entrepreneurial couple Ephraim and Edith who have spent 20 years building the local business from a small scale solar installations to a pioneering energy savings company in Kenya.

GroFin’s investment in Botto Solar has been one of the catalysts in developing a solution to the challenges of the Dadaab refugee camp that hosts refugees from war-torn Somalia. Innovations such as a stove that runs on solar energy have helped multiple families to have access to food, which was otherwise impossible as the camp faced an increasing influx of refugees and could not cater to all of them with conventional cooking methods. Apart from finance, the business has received support to implement a new accounting system and a debt collection strategy as well as key inputs for marketing and product development.

With finance and business support from GroFin, Botto Solar is set to expand and touch many more lives. Botto Solar sustains 39 jobs and employee development is a key focus area given that many of the new hires are unskilled or semi-skilled and some are high school dropouts.

Going forward, GroFin’s objective is to further grow investments in this sector from 4% to 10-15% over the medium term, thereby facilitating access to watersanitation and energy to a wider population, especially to those in severely underserved regions in Sub-Saharan Africa and MENA. We are looking for partners in our mission to build an inclusive green economy, one entrepreneur at a time.

Ultimately, we believe at GroFin that every person deserves to have a stable job and to access basic services such as foodwaterhealthcaresanitationenergy and educationImpact investing is GroFin’s mission and our contribution to the world is to continue our focus on job creation and to accelerate our work in our priority areas of WaterEnergy and WasteAgribusinessHealthcareEducation and Manufacturing.

Grand Care Hospitals Nigeria – Bringing Quality Private Healthcare to Port Harcourt

Entrepreneur Dr. Eke James Amuche is a happy man these days. A number of critical cases have been successfully treated at Grand Care Hospital (a private healthcare facility) in Bayelsa State with its recently purchased fully equipped ambulance and emergency equipment , which would not have been possible previously.

From a radiant warmer that has been used to resuscitate babies suffering from breathing difficulties after birth, to a 4D scanning machine that has enabled early detection of problems during pregnancy and even uncovered a severe cardio-myopathy in an 18-year old, Grand Care Hospitals is now closer to its objective of universal healthcare than ever before.

It was a chance meeting with a GroFin investment manager that finally led to the purchase of the radiant warmer, additional incubating machines and a 4D scanning machine to detect ectopic pregnancies, besides dentaloptical equipment and an ambulance handy for moving patients to bigger hospitals, all of which were sorely needed to resolve the increasing incidence of medical problems faced by the underserved Bayelsa community.

Incidentally, Bayelsa State ranks very low in terms of access to healthcare with a doctor to patient ratio of 1 to 7,000 against a WHO recommendation of 1 to 600.

Grand Care Hospitals was opened to the public in 2010 in Port Harcourt, and then relocated to Yenagoa in Bayelsa State in 2012.

Although significant strides were made to provide quality healthcare in Yenagoa in the early years of operation, Grand Care needed key equipment to make further inroads to improving access to emergency medical support.

Dr. Amuche turned to GroFin after being overwhelmed by a torturous feeling of helplessness as he watched a fifth patient in three months driving off in private transport to the teaching hospital at Ikoloibiri. An ambulance was desperately needed to ensure safe passage for emergency cases, but turning to traditional financiers did not seem to be a guaranteed solution.

The need for modern equipment to handle the complexity of medical problems the hospital was facing in Yenagoa finally drove the entrepreneur to seek finance from GroFinin 2016 to improve the equipment and buy an ambulance for Grand Care Hospitals. The new ambulance is equipped with an oxygen concentratorsuction machine100% oxygen cylinderambubagrespiratorcardiac defibrillatorstretcher and first aid box, all of which come in handy for moving patients to a bigger hospital.

And, the new ambulance could not have arrived more opportunely. Soon after Dr. Amuche received GroFin funding for the ambulance, a woman in the process of delivery was rushed to a neighbouring bigger medical facility with the new ambulance, upon developing complications that indicated the need for a major intestinal surgery.

In addition to the physical equipment, GroFin’s partnership with Grand Care includes the provision of expert business support services. Apart from assistance to formalise the administrative and financial management systems, Dr. Amuche has also been introduced to the Port Harcourt Chamber of Commerce, Industry, Mines and Agriculture (PHCCIMA) for unprecedented access to market linkages.

Besides, the emergency equipment, the community has benefited from free dental and eye screening servicesAffordable and quality healthcare is becoming more and more available to the community surrounding Grand Care; thanks to Dr. Amuche’s vision, backed by GroFin’s investment and business support.

“We are seeing the fulfilment of our dream by providing quality health care for the emerging lower and middle class of Nigeria. GroFin has been the ideal partner for us to achieve this goal,” concludes Dr. Eke James Amuche.

Impact investing comes of age, set to revolutionize the investment world

As impact investing comes of age, to quote the Economist, it is time to take a look at the largest survey of the Impact Investment landscape, and see how this nascent industry is fast becoming a mainstream phenomenon.

A decade into the creation of a formal impact investing industry, the Global Impact Investing Network (GIIN) continues to dig deep into the data generated by the now multiple players —including fund managers, institutional investors, and foundations, as well as field-building organisations, advisors, and others in the impact investing ecosystem— and explore important issues about the market’s development. These investment insights serve to assess the progress the impact industry has made, and identify what is needed to exponentially enhance its scale and effectiveness over the next ten years.

The GIIN’s Annual Impact Investor 2017 Survey is as definitive as it is comprehensive – taking into account the consolidated responses of 209 members of the impact investment world who together manage USD 114 billion in impact investing assets. Factoring in the responses from this broad sample base, the seventh Annual Impact Investor Survey by GIIN found that investors plan to commit USD 25.9 billion in assets to impact investment deals this year, a 17% increase from a year ago. What is most encouraging though is that investors continue to be overwhelmingly satisfied with the performance of their investments – both in terms of their financial return and the impactthey generate. Indeed, 98% respondents reported that the returns met or exceeded their expectations in terms of impact, and 91% reported that this was the case in terms of performance.

Moreover, as the impact investing industry matures, the GIIN notes that impact measurement has grown increasingly nuanced and sophisticated. In the past year alone, there has been a significant increase in in-depth research and data on impact measurement and management and growing collaboration among different players. An indicator of growing maturity, the industry has begun to shift focus from the “why” to the “how” of impact measurement and management, with several recent studies exploring different methodological aspects. Some noteworthy studies are the Tideline’s Navigating Impact Investing publication, GIIN’s The Business Value of Impact Measurement, the Rockefeller Foundation’s Situating the Next Generation of Impact Measurement and Evaluation for Impact Investing and the Bridges Impact+ and Skopos Impact Fund’s More than Measurement.

Further, multi-party data projects such as the World Economic Forum’s Shaping the Future of Impact Investing initiative, the OECD’s multi-participant study, the GIIN’s Navigating Impact initiative, the Impact Measurement Project and the Fourth Sector Mapping Initiative are all indicative of a shift toward increasingly collaborative effortswithin the industry around impact measurement and management.

Finally, three big takeaways from this year’s report were that, first, the impact investment space is broad enough to allow for a range of impact objectives and financial return targets; secondly, large firms are entering this field, but must conform to the high standards set by the existing, niche players, and lastly, the Sustainable Development Goals are influencing both impact objectives and their measurement in a big way. Most significantly, while the entry of large firms is an exciting development as it points to the mainstreaming of impact investing, this phenomenon calls for a wait-and-watch approach as there is a risk of ‘impact dilution’ or mission drift. While large-scale firms will help professionalise and bring credibility to the market, as well as bring in much-needed capital, they may not be as intentional about generating impact, may prioritise returns over impact, or may not sustain their commitment to impact for the long term. Existing, niche players then have the overriding responsibility of ensuring that the impact investment landscape continues to deliver on its promise of socio-economic returns beyond mere financial profits.

As one of the respondents selected to form part of this noteworthy initiative, GroFin is proud to represent the impact investment space in Africa and MENA, and bring its experience and expertise to bear on this comprehensive survey of the impact investing industry. A pioneering impact investor whose fund management capabilities have lent support to over 8,000 entrepreneurs and transformed more than 600 SMEs, GroFin has been active in this nascent industry for the last 13 years.

Indeed, GroFin co-developed a unique Small and Growing Businesses (SGB) model together with the Shell Foundation, that has been successfully applied since 2004 to generate employment at scale and benefit multiple lives at the base of the pyramid. With 95,130 jobs sustained and 480,000 family members supported through its investments as at close of December 2016, GroFin has won CFI.co’s Best Social Impact Finance Africa award for 2017, proving the effectiveness of its model and its application to the SME space in emerging markets.

With its pioneering and award winning model, GroFin has the potential to create exponential impact and uplift entire communities. We invite you to be a part of this far-reaching and impactful movement, whether as an entrepreneur making a difference to the lives of their community, or an investor seeking a reward beyond just financial returns from emerging market investments. If we all come together, impact investing will indeed come of age.

Impact Investing & Education–Learning to make a difference in Africa

Africa’s education story is waiting to be written, but whether it will be written by Africa’s children is a pressing question that haunts the emerging continent.

Consider this – Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) still has 30 million children out of school, and tertiary education is suffering from severe capacity constraints. SSA is also the worst-performing region globally for educational quality and learning outcomes, with up to 40% of children not meeting basic learning outcomes in literacy and numeracy. Moreover, by 2035, the number of Africans joining the workforce (15–64) will exceed that of the rest of the world combined, but SSA’s education systems are not meeting workforce needs.

Sounds like a challenge for any government? It certainly is, and one that no government can possibly rise to. A report highlighting the key role that the private sector is poised to play in Africa’s education landscape then comes as a fitting response to this challenge, replete with a powerful foreword by Liberia’s President, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf.

This definitive report by Caerus Capital is aptly titled “The Business of Education in Africa”, focusing as it does on the contribution of the private sector and on how government can act as the steward of the whole education system.

“The Business of Education in Africa” paints the current landscape of private education in Sub-Saharan Africa, goes on to discuss how African governments can better engage with private education players, highlights opportunities for investing in private education in SSA and delves deep into case studies of interesting companies in education in SSA. It ends with case studies of the education market in South Africa, Nigeria, Kenya, Ethiopia, Senegal & Liberia that may well be some of the most comprehensive insights into the education markets of these key African economies as on date.

While Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 4 mandates that governments have and must continue to commit to access to a free, quality education for children, statistics highlight that around one billion African children will need to be educated over the coming three decades. Keeping pace with this demand requires enormous investment in schools, universities, and other infrastructure; recruitment and training of teachers, school leaders, and support staff; and learning materials. Public education systems will struggle to keep up with this unprecedented increase in demand.

Private sector education is then key to unlock the potential of this vital sector, and meet the rising tide of demand that otherwise threatens to engulf the continent’s children in a sea of darkness.

The report notes that the private sector is already playing a significant role in SSA. While publicly reported data compiled by UNESCO indicates that the private sector has a share of 13.5% in the education sector across 15 countries, the report’s own surveys indicate that the actual share of private schooling might be 21% (or one in five pupils), and this number is only set to rise (to one in four) over the next five years.

However, this enormous opportunity comes with the significant challenge of financing private players in education, with the report identifying a private investment requirement of US$16–$18 billion over the next five years.

The report highlights that education makes for a compelling investment opportunity because it delivers wider benefits in the form of high individual, social, and economic returns, and investors & donors are consequently willing to secure lower financial returns, or even a purely social return on investment.

Impact investing that focuses on social returns over purely financial returns then comes to mind as a lasting solution to the financing woes of private sector schools. While impact investing is a nascent field and impact investors in Africa are few and far between, some stories of positive change in local communities are already being written.

Be it Kenya’s Nairobi International SchoolTanzania’s Daystar SchoolRwanda’s Highland SchoolGhana’s Firm Foundation or South Africa’s Zambesi Akademie, these small businesses hailing from across the African education landscape have one strong link that binds them all — GroFin.